The Arrival City is …

  • © Gerrit Schwalbach / BBSR
  • © die arge lola
  • © Kiên Hoàng Lê
  • © Peter Körner, 2011 / Cristobal Palma, 2006
  • © Florian Thein
  • © Judith Raum / BBSR
  • © Josephine Dannheisig / Christopher Domakis, 2016
  • © Jessica Schäfer

Exhibition

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The Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM) is curating the German Pavilion exhibition Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country at the 15th Venice Architecture Biennale 2016 – La Biennale di Venezia. In charge of the German contribution are Peter Cachola Schmal, general commissioner and director of the Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Oliver Elser, curator at the Deutsches Architekturmuseum, and the project coordinator Anna Scheuermann. The Berlin architecture office Something Fantastic is responsible for the overall design concept of the German Pavilion.

Four large openings in the walls of the German Pavilion have transformed it into an open house. Over 48 tons of brick were removed from the landmark-protected walls. The pavilion is open. Germany is open. Last year, Germany’s borders were kept open to receive over a million refugees. Although currently the EU borders are largely closed for refugees, the gesture of opening the house is a call to rethink Germany as a welcoming nation for immigrants.

With the exhibition the DAM is using examples from Germany’s Arrival Cities to pose for discussion a series of theses developed in collaboration with the Canadian author Doug Saunders. His book Arrival City: How the Largest Migration in History is Reshaping Our World has inspired a shift in perspective on immigrant districts—a shift that is also applicable to Germany. Although these districts are typically characterized as “problem areas,” they offer residents and new arrivals the most important prerequisites of an Arrival City: affordable housing, access to work, small-scale commercial spaces, good access to public transit, networks of immigrants from the same culture, as well as a tolerant attitude that extends to the acceptance of informal practices.

However, before any of the numerous new arrivals can become regular immigrants, there are currently thousands of refugees living in first admittance facilities and shared accommodations across Germany. Using specific examples, the German Pavilion will present the architectural qualities of these buildings in an exhibition room dedicated to this particular construction task. The examples have been chosen from the database. This growing archive of realised and under-construction refugee buildings across Germany and Europe offers a comprehensive picture of the current reality, and is an exhortation to step up and meet the dire need for affordable and high-quality residential space. Indeed, this is one of the central prerequisites for a successful integration process.

The Open Pavilion

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Four large openings in the walls of the German Pavilion have transformed it into an open house. Over 48 tons of brick were removed from the landmark-protected walls. The pavilion is open. Germany is open. Last year, Germany’s borders were kept open to receive over a million refugees. Although currently the EU borders are largely closed for refugees, the gesture of opening the house is a call to rethink Germany as a welcoming nation for immigrants.

The opening of the German Pavilion and its transformation into a lively public space was developed in collaboration with Something Fantastic. For these Berlin-based architects, opening up the pavilion is not only a political, urban planning, and architectural statement, but also a welcoming gesture for exhibition visitors. They’ve provided indoor and outdoor seating, free WLAN, power stations, white plastic chairs, and an ayran fountain that will be running during the opening days of the Biennale, operated by a Lebanese caterer from Mestre, the Arrival City in Venice.
The opening of the walls was carefully coordinated with Emanuela Carpani, the head of the Venetian office of monument preservation.

The three-sided steel frames are earthquake-proof and will be removed when the openings are bricked in again. Nevertheless it cannot be denied: a massive intervention is being made into the material of the monument itself - an intervention that amounts to a new interpretation of the German Pavilion.

News

  • Die Neue Völkerwanderung. Dokumentarfilm von Jörg Daniel Hissen, Erstausstrahlung auf ARTE

  • Making Heimat - Social Scale - Symposium zur Ausstellungseröffnung. Veranstaltungsort: Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM), Frankfurt am Main. Eintritt: 30 Euro

  • Opening Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country at Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM)

  • DIE STADT + DIE ARRIVAL CITY. Wie Offenbach seine Migranten integriert. Veranstaltungsort: Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM), Frankfurt am Main

  • Making Heimat - Symposium Flüchtlingsbauten. Veranstaltungsort: Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM), Frankfurt am Main. Eintritt: 10 Euro

Refugee Housing Projects

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The Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM) has been gathering projects for refugees and migrants that are already finished or still underway since October 2015. The online database will be updated and supplemented on an ongoing basis. The projects depict the reality of the current situation facing Germany. They are grouped according to size, cost and number of occupants per square meter, material, and construction. The database is not a best-of collection nor is it an architecture prize—instead, it’s meant to provoke discussion. It aims to help us compare current solutions and provide a foundation for local and regional policymakers. In order to facilitatefurther exchange, the database also assembles international projects.

The spectrum ranges from temporary lightweight structures that house 300 people, whose interiors have been designed by an architect, to low-cost long-term housing projects not only intended to house refugees. An emphasis has been laid on wooden modular structures. Yet the scope of the database also ranges from projects initiated by citizen groups to the efforts of a private benefactor to create an estate–like complex for artists and refugees.

To compile the projects for the database, DAM has collaborated with the architecture magazine Bauwelt. Additionally, DAM is partnering with the Berlin Senate Department for Urban Development and the Environment to host the Berlin Award 2016 – Heimat in der Fremde, a global competition to identify innovative concepts for refugee housing.
For further proposals feel free to contact Tiziana Agus of the Deutsches Architekturmuseum: projekte@makingheimat.de

Publication

A catalogue will be published by Hatje Cantz accompany the exhibition Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country in the German Pavilion at the 15th International Architecture Exhibition 2016 – La Biennale di Venezia.

Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country
eds. Peter Cachola Schmal, Oliver Elser, Anna Scheuermann
Texts by Doug Saunders and others.
Graphic design by Something Fantastic, Berlin
English, German

  1. ca. 288 pgs., ca. 120 ills.
    13.50 x 21.00 cm
    softcover
    ISBN 978-3-7757-4141-5
    9,80 €

Contact

  • Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM)
    Schaumainkai 43
    60596 Frankfurt am Main
    Tel +49.69.212 38844
    info@makingheimat.de
    www.dam-online.de

    BUREAU N cultural communications
    Naunynstrasse 38
    10999 Berlin
    Tel +49.30.62736102
    makingheimat@bureau-n.de
    www.bureau-n.de

    SOMETHING FANTASTIC
    Leipziger Str. 61
    10117 Berlin
    Tel +49.30.34082162
    contact@somethingfantastic.net
    www.somethingfantastic.net

  • TEAM
    The Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM) was commissioned by the Federal Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) to realize the German Pavilion exhibition, Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country, at the 15th International Architecture Exhibition 2016 – La Biennale di Venezia.

    General commissioner:

    Peter Cachola Schmal, Direktor DAM

    Curator:
    Project coordinator:
    Consultants:

    Doug Saunders, Toronto and Kai Vöckler, Offenbach

    Curatorial assistant:

    Felix Torkar

    Research assistant:

    Tiziana Agus

    Intern:

    Gala Nettelbladt

    Location scout Offenbach:

    Loimi Brautmann

    Graphic design and exhibition design:

    Something Fantastic, Berlin: Elena Schütz, Julian Schubert, Leonard Streich with Julius Fischötter, Marius Helten, Ruben Bernegger, Charlotte Schönberger

    Architect in Venice:

    Clemens F. Kusch and Martin Weigert, cfk Architetti

    Event manager in Venice:

    Tomas Ewald

    Public relations and communications:

    BUREAU N cultural communications: Julia Albani, Silke Neumann, Joanna Kamm, Joanne Pouzenc, Sören Zuppke

    DAM:

    Brita Köhler, Stefanie Lampe

    Administration:

    Inka Plechaty, Jacqueline Brauer

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